“A MASSIVE IGNORANCE OF PAIN,” HOW THE CDC AND DEA-DOJ POLICIES CRIMINALLY UNDERMINED PAIN CARE IN UNITED STATES, HAVE CAUSED DEATHS AND THREATENS THE LIVES OF MILLIONS: RICHARD “RED” LAWHERN PH.D. KICKING-ASS AND TAKING NAMES, JEFF SINGER MD., “FOLLOW THE SCIENCE”

REPORTED AND EDITED

BY

NORMAN J CLEMENT RPH., DDS, NORMAN L.CLEMENT PHARM-TECH, MALACHI F. MACKANDAL PHARMD, BELINDA BROWN-PARKER, IN THE SPIRIT OF JOSEPH SOLVO ESQ., IN THE SPIRIT OF REV. C.T. VIVIAN, JELANI ZIMBABWE CLEMENT, BS., MBA., IN THE SPIRIT OF ERLIN CLEMENT SR., WILLIE GUINYARD BS., JOSEPH WEBSTER MD., MBA, BEVERLY C. PRINCE MD., FACS., LEROY BAYLOR,   JAY K. JOSHI MD., MBA, ADRIENNE EDMUNDSON, ESTER HYATT PH.D., WALTER L. SMITH BS., IN THE SPIRIT OF BRAHM FISHER ESQ., MICHELE ALEXANDER MD., CUDJOE WILDING BS, MARTIN NDJOU, BS., RPH., IN THE SPIRIT OF DEBRA LYNN SHEPHERD, BERES E. MUSCHETT, STRATEGIC ADVISORS

RICHARD “RED’ LAWHERN PH.D.

AN AUDIO PODCAST PRESENTATION

GOVERNMENTS MASSIVE IGNORANCE OF PAIN AND PAIN CONTROL

North Carolina’s Richard “Red” Lawhern, Ph.D. has spent years debunking PROPaganda about the supposed dangers of prescribed opiate analgesics.

His analyses show that they didn’t cause the “opioid crisis,” that “overprescribing” is a fiction, that both the US prescribing guideline and its Canadian derivative are shady business beyond repair, and that undertreating pain is deadly. While a rethink happens stateside, Dr. Lawhern says Ottawa’s pain policy remains “fraudulent from one end to the other” and that Health Canada is “racketeer-influenced and corrupt.” Asserting untruths about both policy and outcomes, he says, “ought to result in somebody doing prison time.”

RICHARD LAWHERN PH.D.

HOW PROP, CDC, DEA WORKED TOGETHER TO CREATE THE OPIOID CRISIS HOAX, INSURANCE COMPANIES THE AMERICAN HEALTHCARE DELIVERY SYSTEM

Listen to Richard “Red” Lawhern, Ph.D., US patient advocate “kicking ass, and taking names”

https://www.cpcs.support/the-pain-pod/2021/8/18/noted-us-patient-advocate-kicks-ass-takes-names

THE OFFICIAL ROLE OF DEA IS CONTRARY TO THEIR ACTIONS

As a law enforcement agency, DEA is not in a position to authorize or dictate what a doctor prescribes to a patient. DEA cannot grant waivers of any kind when it comes to the practice of medicine because no sick waiver exists. As the United States’ competent body charges with the management of controlled substances and chemicals for scientific, medical, research, and industrial applications; DEA regulates the flow of controlled substances, not the practice of medicine. The changing prescribing practices of practitioners are derived by a shift to prescribe medicine consistent with the guidance issued by the Center for Disease Control and Prevention along with the guidance and recommendations of state boards of medicine.

CATO INSTITUTE DR.JEFFEREY SINGER MD PODCAST, JUNE 1, 2021

JEFF SINGERS MD:

POLITICIANS AND POLICEMEN SHOULD LEAVE THE PRACTICE OF MEDICINE TO DOCTORS AND SCIENTISTS

Follow the Science on Opioids

Listen to another of Dr. Jeff Singer’s podcasts on “Following the Science”.

https://www.cato.org/multimedia/cato-daily-podcast/follow-science-opioids

DOCUMENTS IDENTIFYING HOW THE CDC CREATED THE OPIOID CRISIS IN AMERICA

THE THOMAS FREIDMAN LETTER

LYNN WEBSTER MD
LYNN R. WEBSTER. MD
MAJOR FLAWS CDC OPIOID GUIDELINES

ONE OF THE GREATEST DANGERS OF ANDREW KOLODNY MD., AND HIS MISGUIDED OPINION IS ON RACE AND PAIN, “DISCRIMINATION PROTECT AFRICAN AMERICANS AND SAVE THEIR LIVES”

One of the most troubling examples of research bias appeared on Fewer opioid prescriptions meant fewer deaths (possibly 14,000), but the episode also reveals how prevalent and harmful stereotypes can be, even if implicit.

It is December 5, 2019, New York Times on “A Rare Case Where Racial Biases’ Protected African-Americans,” By Austin Frakt and Toni Monkovic 

When the opioid crisis began to escalate some 20 years ago, many African-Americans had a layer of protection against it.

But that protection didn’t come from the effectiveness of the American medical system. Instead, researchers believe, it came from racial stereotypes embedded within that system.

As unlikely as it may seem, these negative stereotypes appear to have shielded many African-Americans from fatal prescription opioid overdoses. This is not a new finding. But for the first time, analysis has put a number behind it, projecting that around 14,000 black Americans would have died had their mortality rates related to prescription opioids been equivalent to that of white Americans.

Starting in the 1990s, new prescription opioids were marketed more aggressively in white rural areas, where pain drug prescriptions were already high. African-Americans received fewer opioid prescriptions, some researchers think, because doctors believed, contrary to fact, that black people 1) were more likely to become addicted to the drugs 2) would be more likely to sell the drugs, and 3) had a higher pain threshold than white people because they were biologically different.

A fourth possibility is that some white doctors were more empathetic to the pain of people who were like them and less empathetic to those who weren’t. Some of this bias “can be unconscious,” said Dr. Andrew Kolodny, a director of opioid policy research at Brandeis University.

This accidental benefit for African-Americans is far outweighed by the long history of harm they have endured from inferior health care, including infamous episodes like the Tuskegee study. And it doesn’t remedy the way damaging stereotypes continue to influence aspects of medical practice today. “The reason to study this further is twofold,” 

Dr. Kolodny said. “It’s easy to imagine the harm that could come to blacks in the future, and we need to know what went wrong with whites, and how they were left exposed” to overprescribing. The prescription-opioid-related mortality rates of black and white Americans were relatively similar two decades ago, but researchers found that by 2010, the rate was two times higher for whites than for African-Americans.

Because African-Americans were less likely to receive those prescriptions, they were less likely to become addicted — though they were more likely to endure unnecessary and excruciating pain for illnesses like cancer.

ANDREW KOLODNY MD OF PROP 2011 MEETING TO CREATE OPIOID GUIDELINE AUGUST 31, 2011 NEW YORK CITY

ANDREW KOLODNY MD ROLE IN OPIOID POLICY IS FINANCIALLY TIED TO SUBOXONE

KOLODNY FAILS TO REVEAL HIS FINANCIAL CONFLICT WITH THE MANUFACTURE OF BUPRENORPHINE

Cannabis, diet: do they work for pain?

Listen to Dr. Mary Lynch

https://www.cpcs.support/the-pain-pod/2021/7/21/cannabis-diet-do-they-work-for-pain

Dr. Mary Lynch has long advocated for treating pain well, whatever it takes — maybe even diet and cannabinoids. She’s one of the founders of the Pain Medicine certification program at Canada’s Royal College of Physicians and Surgeons, is a past president of the Canadian Pain Society, and is Professor of Anesthesia, Psychiatry, and Pharmacology at Dalhousie University in Halifax, where she works in the pain clinic at the QEII Health Sciences Centre.

CONTRIBUTIONS ACCEPTED TO CASH APP: $docnorm

FOR NOW, YOU ARE WITHIN

“THE NEMESIS” BENJAMIN CLEMENTINE 2015

THE NORMS

REFERENCE:

2.

DEA LETTER TO RICHARD LAWHERN:

” This letter is in response to your email dated July 15, 2019, to the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA). In your correspondence, you raised concerns regarding chronic pain management, closure of pain treatment centers, and the “exodus of providers out of the pain management practice.” DEA appreciates the opportunity to address your concerns, and clarify information regarding this matter. 

The Controlled Substances Act (CSA) and its implementing regulations established a closed system of distribution to ensure appropriate medical care and to maintain the integrity of the system through an accountability process. 

One of the most important principles underlying the CSA and its implementing regulations is that to be valid, every prescription for a controlled substance must be based on a determination by an individual practitioner, that the dispensing of the controlled substance is for a legitimate medical purpose in the usual course of professional practice. United States v. Moore, 423 U.S.C. 122 (1975) and 21 CFR 1306.04(a). 

Federal regulations do not define the term legitimate medical purpose nor do they set forth the standards of medical practice. It is up to each DEA-registered practitioner authorized by DEA to do so, to treat patients according to his or her professional medical judgement in accordance with a standard of medical practice that is generally recognized and accepted in the United States. 

DEA has not promulgated any new regulations regarding the treatment of pain. Federal law and DEA regulations do not impose a specific quantitative minimum or maximum limit on the amount of medication that a practitioner may prescribe on a single prescription, or the duration of treatment intended for a particular patient. 

PAGE-1
PAGE-2
RICHARD LAWHERN “HORSEFEATHERS

DEA has consistently emphasized and supported the prescriptive authority of an individual practitioner under the CSA to administer, dispense, and prescribe controlled substances for the legitimate treatment of pain within acceptable medical standards as outlined in DEA’s policy statement published in the Federal Register (FR) on September 6, 2006, titled, Dispensing Controlled Substances for the Treatment of Pain. 71 FR 52716. 

While DEA is the agency responsible for enforcing the CSA, DEA does not act as the Federal equivalent of a state medical board overseeing the general practice of medicine and lacks the authority to issue guidelines that constitute advice relating to the general practice of medicine. 

Therefore, it is important for you to check with your state medical board, as the issues that you have raised, maybe the result of new laws or regulations enacted by your state. Where state law or regulations impose requirements beyond those in federal law and regulations, practitioners must 

Richard A. Lawhern, Ph.D. Page 2 

comply with the additional state requirements, provided such state requirements do not conflict with the Federal requirements.” 

Leave a Reply