WALMART, WALL STREET JOURNAL, RONALD MYERS MD., GREG BELCHER MD., LINDA CHEEKS MD., VILASNI GANESH MD., PAUL VOLKMAN MD., ALL VICTIMS OF MASSIVE GOVERNMENT OVERREACH BY DOJ, DEA ACTIONS AND POLICIES, Part-1

PART-1, OF THE DASGUPTA, BELETSKY, CICCARONE PROTOCOLS

BY

NORMAN J CLEMENT RPH., DDS, NORMAN L.CLEMENT PHARM-TECH, MALACHI F. MACKANDAL PHARMD, BELINDA BROWN-PARKER, IN THE SPIRIT OF JOSEPH SOLVO ESQ., IN THE SPIRIT OF REV. C.T. VIVIAN, JELANI ZIMBABWE CLEMENT, BS., MBA., IN THE SPIRIT OF ERLIN CLEMENT SR., WILLIE GUINYARD BS., JOSEPH WEBSTER MD., MBA, BEVERLY C. PRINCE MD., FACS., LEROY BAYLOR,   JAY K. JOSHI MD., MBA, ADRIENNE EDMUNDSON, ESTER HYATT PH.D., WALTER L. SMITH BS., IN THE SPIRIT OF BRAHM FISHER ESQ., MICHELE ALEXANDER MD., CUDJOE WILDING BS, MARTIN NDJOU, BS., RPH., IN THE SPIRIT OF DEBRA LYNN SHEPHERD, BERES E. MUSCHETT, STRATEGIC ADVISORS

OPIOID SETTLEMENT HELPS POLITICIANS WITH THEIR CAMPAIGN CONTRIBUTION AND UNDERMINES YOUR DOCTOR PATIENTS RELATIONSHIP

Wall Street Journal:

” The opioid settlement is another example in a growing list of lawsuits that redistribute income from the larger society to rich plaintiff attorneys, who then help politicians with their campaign contributions, who then rehire the lawyers to help with more mass tort claims. Alas, it’s the American way.”

Politicians and plaintiff attorneys claim the companies hooked hundreds of thousands of Americans on opioids with deceptive marketing and negligent dispensing practices to boost their bottom line.

The main problem with this argument is that opioids such as oxycodone require a doctor’s prescription. Thousands of doctors would have to have been complicit in the conspiracy. Ditto the Drug Enforcement Administration, which is supposed to monitor and control opioid shipments by distributors to pharmacies.

PERSECUTION OF VILASNI GANESH AND HER HUSBAND GREGORY BELCHER MD HOW DOJ DEA USE HEALTHCARE FRAUD TO TARGET PHYSICIANS

They have a point. But the suit was even more misguided because the overdose crisis was never caused by doctors “hooking” their patients on opioids. That’s a false narrative that is convenient for politicians searching for a scapegoat and an easy solution.

No federal law supersedes these state laws. Instead, the DEA has issued informal guidance on how pharmacists should ascertain whether an opioid prescription is medically legitimate. But this guidance doesn’t carry the force of law or regulation, and it has sometimes contradicted other federal guidance and statements on opioid dispensation. 

LINDA CHEEKS MD., A DOCTOR WITH COURAGE

LISTEN TO THE WORDS OF RONALD MYERS MD IN THIS INTERVIEW FROM PAIN PATIENT ADVOCACY WEEK IN 2017 

LINDA CHEEKS MD, A DOCTOR WITH COURAGE

WITH LINDA CHEEKS MD

HERE:

Dr. Ronald Myers was a leading advocate for health care to the poor and disenfranchised. The founder and chairman of The American Pain Institue and the Myers Foundation For Indigent Health Care and Community Development.

REV. RONALD MYERS MD AMERICAN HERO

A 1985 graduate of the University of Wisconsin Medical School and residency in Family Practice at L.S.U. Medical Center, Doc Myers was a leading national advocate for health care to the poor and disenfranchised. In 1990 he became the first ordained and commissioned medical missionary to serve in America’s poorest region, the Mississippi Delta, in the history of the African American church. Dr. Myers provided health care to the poorest Americans through clinics in Tchula, Belzoni, Yazoo City, Indianola, Greenville, and Tupelo, Mississippi. He went on missions outreach to Kenya and Israel.

“THE UNIVERSAL DISPARITY” FROM THE APARTHEID MUSEUM JOHANNESBURG, SOUTH AFRICA

Yet in the eyes of the United States, Drug Enforcement Agency and the Department (DEA), this brilliant medical clinician was another uppidity-arrogant N-word who needed to be taught a lesson, criminalized, and imprisoned. Listen to this 2017 interview with Linda Cheeks, MD., from “Doctors with Courage.” of our hero Ronald Myers MD.

Rev. Ronald V. Myers, Sr., MD was a family practitioner in Mississippi. He lost his license because of attacks on him by the state of Oklahoma. The charges were dropped, but his license was never restored to active status because of fines levied on him by the Board of Medicine for the unfounded investigation they led against him. In other words, “Pay us for attacking you without just cause.”

PAUL VOLKMAN MD., PHD., FEDERAL INMATE NUMBER 19519-424 RECEIVED MORE TIME THAN EL CHAPO AND THE UNI-BOMBER COMBINED

JUDICIAL CORRUPTION Paul Volkman MD, PH.D., obtained both a medical degree and a doctorate in pharmacology from the University of Chicago. Supreme Court precedent will not topple quadruple life sentences for a drug-dealing doctor whose prescriptions caused four patient deaths, the Sixth Circuit ruled. Yet search and arrest warrants have absolutely no elements of criminal activity and lack evidence of probable cause.

Inside the System: a Chronic Pain Doctor Speaks

https://www.cpcs.support/the-pain-pod/2021/4/21/inside-the-system-a-chronic-pain-doctor-speaks

THE DASGUPTA, BELETSKY, CICCARONE PROTOCOLS

TO TURN THE TIDE, FOCUS ON SUFFERING

ACCORDING TO DASGUPTA, et al.:

“The observation that Canada and the United States have the highest per capita opioid analgesic consumption is central to the belief that these medicines are overprescribed, leading to the unrealistic expectation that curtailing dispensing will automatically reduce overdose. In practice, overprescribing is an amalgamation of prescribing behaviors encompassing starting dose, number of units in a prescription, dosing schedules, potency, and other factors. A rational approach would treat these as parallel but distinct issues.

Yet, the legislative and clinical reaction has included efforts to bring dosage below arbitrary targets or abandon patients who do not conform to clinically arbitrary expectations. 30

The emphasis on prescribing volume may be a manifestation of subconscious racial bias that frames the famously White opioid crisis as inadvertently induced by physicians; this stands in direct contrast with previous drug panics perceived to afflict minorities, whose drug use was considered a moral failing.57,58 This framing, along with the medicalized view of addiction, leaves intact the dignity of people seeking drug treatment—no doubt a positive rhetorical change if applied to all people.

Yet, we have spent decades pathologizing members of minority communities for turning to drugs to cope with social stressors and structural inequities. That these phenomena may also afflict White, rural, and suburban communities is emerging as a new realization in public discourse.

However, overdose is not isolated to these areas: approximately 41% of drug overdose deaths occur in urban counties, 26% in the suburbs, 18% in small metropolitan areas, and 15% in rural communities.59 Native Americans are disproportionally affected by overdose deaths as are African Americans in Illinois, Wisconsin, Missouri, Minnesota, West Virginia, and Washington, DC, among other places.60a, 60b

“HORSE FEATHERS”

This is not merely a story about disadvantage (in income, race, place, etc.). On the basis of epidemiological studies, structural advantages in health care access may have contributed to increased opioid prescribing61 and availability62 among White patients.

However, reverse associations were observed in controlled clinic-based experiments in which Black patients ended up receiving more opioids, possibly mediated through interactions with patient assertiveness,63 physician gender, and cognitive load.64 Regardless, the experience of many seeking health care to manage long-term pain and substance use disorders is tinged with racial undertones. Diez Roux warns:

We should guard against the unintended consequence that the focus on the increase in death rates in some Whites (significant as they are) detract attention from the persistent health inequities by race and social class, which are so large that they dwarf the size of what is a very troublesome increase in some Whites.” 65(p1566)

FOR NOW, YOU ARE WITHIN

THE NORMS

REFERENCE:

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60a. Murphy T, Pokhrel P, Worthington A, Billie H, Sewell M, Bill N. Unintentional injury mortality among American Indians and Alaska Natives in the United States, 1990–2009. Am J Public Health. 2014;104(suppl 3):S470–S480. [PMC free article] [PubMed] [Google Scholar]

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https://www.thechicagourbanleague.org/cms/lib/IL07000264/Centricity/Domain/1/Whitewashed%20A A%20Opioid%20Crisis%2011-15-17_EMBARGOED_%20FINAL.pdf. Accessed December 14, 2017. [Google Scholar]

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